Safety: Take it Home

At Hecla, we TAKE SAFETY HOME.

The family of Casa Berardi Engineering Intern, William Bourque, owns land in the Lanaudiére region and in recent years the forest has filled with branches and dead trees. So they decided to do a big cleaning, which is impossible without the help of a chainsaw. Knowing that this tool is dangerous, William has adopted safe behavior when using it. Before cutting each tree, he takes the time to analyze the risks of the tree falling when cutting it. At all times, he wears steel-toed boots, chaps, long-sleeved clothing, gloves, a helmet with integrated visor, protective glasses and hearing protection. He has adopted this safe behavior in order to limit the possible dangers when using a chainsaw.

 

Hecla Safety at Home

Casa Berardi’s Jasmin Mercier saw a neighbor camper doing repairs to his trailer awning. Recognizing the potential risk for injury, Jasmin asked the camper to do a “Take five.” He asked, “Will you please come down and wait 5 minutes for me to find a suitable ladder?” Jasmin went to find the owner of the campground, who had a more substantial ladder for the task at hand. Here is the result 10 minutes later!

 

Hecla Safety at Home

While refurbishing a bus, San Sebastian’s Claudio Vasquez and his young nephew were sweeping and taking out garbage. After these first tasks were completed, they took a short break. During the rest, Claudio took the opportunity to explain the tools and equipment they would be using: A manual screwdriver, an electric blower and a cordless drill. His nephew was very happy to know Claudio would allow him to use the screwdriver and that he’d be able to place his hand on top of Claudio’s to feel the vibrations of the blower and the drill. Claudio explained that “Mrs. Rotation and Mr. Blowing Air are not friends of the eyes, much better if you protect them.” Claudio then introduced the protection they would use for their eyes—clear safety glasses. Claudio also told his nephew that if the lenses fogged up and he couldn’t see, then they must stop to change lenses or clean them. They then took a photo to send to his nephew’s mother so his nephew could tell her later about the phrase that Claudio taught him.

 

Hecla Safety at Home

The family of Polly Johnson, Hecla’s Manager of Compensation and Benefits, has an unwavering rule at their River house: No little ones on the dock without a life jacket, even when they are with an adult. When Polly’s young granddaughter wants to go down by the water, she always tells Polly that she needs her “orange” (life jacket).

 

Hecla Safety at Home

Hecla geologist Jonathan Moore was working in his yard with his two young children. He regularly demonstrates to them how Hecla teaches him to stay safe. On this day, his son said, “Dad, I might get dirt in my eyes so I need safety glasses,” and ran to get them. His younger sister came to help and he got another pair of safety glasses for her. Then, the boy wanted to help mow the grass and said that he needed hearing protection. Jonathan realized that his children had been listening and watching his actions on safety.

 

Hecla Safety at Home

Hecla Nevada Controller Alan London shared this photo of his five-year-old granddaughter who is always ready and willing to help with projects around the house. She has listened to her grandpa about the importance of safety gear. The girl wears hearing protection, safety glasses, knee pads and boots so she is ready for any situation.

 

Hecla Safety at Home

Lucky Friday contractor Brandon Junso was working in the yard and blew out his weed eater. With his four-year-old son watching, he used a powerful air compressor to fix the carburetor. Brandon’s safety training had taught him to have the valve on the nozzle at a level that would not cause significant harm. While he was doing yard work, his son picked up the compressor and was using the nozzle to blow his hair back and puff up his cheeks. Brandon captured his son’s dangerous actions in a photo so he could show him what not to do and then had him model how to use it the correct way. Brandon disconnected the nozzle entirely until his son is old enough to fully understand the potential danger.

 

Hecla Safety at Home

Hecla Nevada employee John Marma had lectured his children about safety so he was pleased when they proactively put on the equipment that was needed in order to perform their tasks safely. John’s son wore a glove, and hearing and eye protection to help his dad grind a piece of metal for their trailer. And his daughter donned a hat, sunglasses, sunscreen and gloves to pull weeds and remove rubbish from the flower garden.

 

Hecla Safety at Home

San Sebastian employee Victor Cortez has taught his son all about safety. The boy is a competitive mountain biker and the most important part of his safety protocol is managing risks. During every ride, he wears a helmet, gloves and glasses to help keep him safe. Victor’s son does pre-checks to make sure every part of his bike is working correctly, and he keeps a tool kit with him at all times in case anything goes wrong. Even though he tries to pick the routes with low traffic, he has multiple warning lights on his bike so others can see him on the road.

 


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